Spend Smart. Eat Smart.

Grains

How Much in a Day?

Grain products are foods made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, or any other grains.

According to MyPlate and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, school-age youth need about 5 to 8 ounces of grains a day; adults need 6 to 8 ounces.

Daily Reccommendation* Daily minimum amount of whole grains
Children 2-3 years old: 3 ounce equivalents
4-8 years old: 5 ounce equivalents
2-3 years old: 1.5 ounce equivalents
4-8 years old: 2.5 ounce equivalents
Girls  9-13 years old: 5 ounce equivalents
14-18 years old: 6 ounce equivalents
 9-13 years old: 3 ounce equivalents
14-18 years old: 6 ounce equivalents
Boys   9-13 years old: 6 ounce equivalents
14-18 years old: 8 ounce equivalents
  9-13 years old: 3 ounce equivalents
14-18 years old: 4 ounce equivalents
Women 19-30 years old: 6 ounce equivalents
31-50 years old: 6 ounce equivalents
51+ years old: 5 ounce equivalents
19-30 years old: 3 ounce equivalents
31-50 years old: 3 ounce equivalents
51+ years old: 3 ounce equivalents
Men 19-30 years old: 8 ounce equivalents
31-50 years old: 7 ounce equivalents
51+ years old: 6 ounce equivalents
19-30 years old: 4 ounce equivalents
31-50 years old: 3.5 ounce equivalents
51+ years old: 3 ounce equivalents

*These amounts are appropriate for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of moderate physical activity beyond normal daily activities. Those who are more physically active may be able to consume more while staying within calorie needs. Source: ChooseMyPlate

In general, a 1-ounce equivalent is:

 Storing and Discarding

Video/Handout

How to store bread video | Handout

Grain Choices

Look for whole grain.

Whole grain products may cost a few cents more but the added nutritional value makes them a smart buy. Use these clues to make sure you get the whole grain you pay for.

Be patient and experiment.

If your family prefers or currently eats refined bread and crackers, start with products that list both whole wheat and enriched flour, but make sure whole wheat is first on the ingredient list.

 

Videos/Handouts

Links